Demystifying the Myths Associated with Motorcycle Safety

This time of year, motorcycles are everywhere and they are exposed to heightened safety risks on the road.  The annual summer influx of motorcyclists on roads and highways can be especially risky when other drivers are often distracted or careless. Many motorcycle safety myths turn out to be wrong when you actually do some fact checking.

According to the Huffington Post, here are some of the popular safety myths and urban legends that are heard most often.  Our hope is that by shedding some light on these fallacies we can provide bikers with the right information to make educated and informed motorcycle safety decisions.  Here are five notorious myths:

1. Country Roads and City Streets are Safer than the Highway

According to a 2007 study, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the majority of motorcycle crashes happen on non-interstate roads.  Although it is correct that you can ride much faster on highways than on city streets and country roads, the traffic is going in the same direction, there are wider lanes and the absence of oncoming traffic removes many common dangers that motorcyclists run into.  This study also stated that “nearly 6 out of 10 two-vehicle motorcycle crashes involving passenger vehicles occurred on urban roadways.”

2. Loud Pipes Saves Lives

The “loud pipes save lives” argument is one you hear almost all the time.  They are said to save lives because the increased noise will get the attention of drivers thereby increasing their awareness of the motorcyclist.

However, physics will not back you up on this one.  The loudest sound generated by a motorcycle is the exhaust, which is directed backwards.  Therefore, you are actually leaving the sound behind you as you travel forward. Even the loudest bike engines have difficulty grabbing a driver’s attention, because most vehicles being driven today minimize road noise with sound deadening insulation and come equipped with multiple speakers.

So, forget the loud pipes. Your best bet is to be seen, not heard.

3. Drivers Will See You

One popular practice among motorcyclists is to assume that drivers won’t see you, which is why they prefer to ride close to the dividing line and the leftmost lane to avoid being in a driver’s blind spot.  However, even the most careful drivers can sometimes miss something, you can overcome the fact that you might be hard to see or harder to notice by wearing bright colors or reflective material on your jacket or helmet and always run your high beam during the day.

4. If You Are Going to Crash, Lay Your Bike Down

The fact is, if you are about to crash, there is simply no time to make a decision other than to brake and attempt to swerve in order to avoid the crash.  The last place you want to put yourself and your bike is on the pavement.

The best way to deal with collisions, of course, is to drive safely, defensively and attempt to avoid them altogether.

5. One Beer Won’t Hurt

If you get on your motorcycle after that “one beer”, the effects can alter your life.  A single beer can alter your judgment, and no matter how unaffected you think you are; you are more likely to take stupid chances.  Even those several drinks you consumed the night before could still be affecting you the next morning.  Therefore, if you plan on having a drink, make sure you also plan an alternative ride home.

For more information regarding motorcycle safety, visit: https://www.nhtsa.gov/

Motorcycle accidents can lead to a range of injuries or death.  If you or your loved one has been injured in a motorcycle accident, we can help.  At Kenison Law Office, we are dedicated to seeking full and fair compensation you need to deal with your injuries.  We understand how daunting it can be to think about a lawsuit while trying to recover, but you can be sure that our team can help you pursue the compensation you deserve. For a free initial consultation call us at (603) 471-3550 or contact us through our website: https://www.kenisonlaw.com/

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